35 Years in the Gas Turbine Industry
Where our renowned history meets a promising future

March of 1983, Turbine Technology Services (TTS) was founded. Our first project was in Saudi Arabia and involved taking over the operations of a 7EA power plant. This was a high-pressure project; it was not wise to disappoint the Sheik. The project lasted 2 ½ years, it was a fabulous way to begin our journey.

But this announcement isn’t so much about our history and what we were, but more about what we have become and where we are going. Our team of 40+ engineering professionals has traveled millions of miles to over 90 countries serving more than 400 clients managing hundreds of gas turbine installations and modernization projects and providing innovative and integrated engineering solutions – our hallmark.

We are part of the TTS Energy Services portfolio of companies, and, with our sister company Reciprocating Technology Services, we are positioned for growth. As an alternative to the OEMs, both organizations offer agility, innovation and experience delivering industry leading aftermarket parts, modernization, optimization, upgrading and custom services for our power generation and gas compression and transmission clients.

“This is an exciting time to be connected to such a great team of engineers and professionals who live and breathe customer centric values, power generation and technology innovation.” George Gramatikas, Founder, TTS.

Today the power generation industry is experiencing disruption of unprecedented scope and speed. OEMs are laying off employees and struggling to restructure their organizations.

TTS Energy Services is not down-sizing, but rather up-sizing. We have focused our strengths on growing the business, meeting new challenges and exploring a future that is filled with opportunities and promise.

Breaking News: GE Frame 5PA Upgrade Motivated by Forced Outage Also Works for 6B and 7B-EA

TTS Successfully Converts a Mark V Fuel Control to Electronic Valves

A paper products plant in the Southeast was planning for a major spring 2017 inspection for their Frame 5 with preparations were well underway in October 2016 when suddenly, the unit tripped on high vibration, just as day shift arrived at the facility.

An original Row 2 bucket failed, causing considerable downstream damage. Management decided to begin necessary repairs immediately and to conduct the machine’s third major inspection at the same time.

The Frame 5 cogen unit had accumulated nearly 115,000 total fired hours and 1,500 starts since its commission in 1997. The 24.5-MW (on gas) MS5001PA engine was equipped with a DLN-1 combustion system and capable of dual-fuel firing. It was one of the most advanced Frame 5s in the fleet when it was first installed.

Since its commissioning, the 12 combustion, six hot-gas-path (HGP) and three major inspections typically revealed little beyond normal wear and tear. In fact, few significant modifications had been made to the basic engine in its two decades of service and plant personnel told the editors that the bucket failure was the first major issue suffered by the gas turbine in its lifetime.

Chris Mancini of Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis Ltd was informed of the unit trip and its likely damage shortly after it occurred. He and a superintendent were onsite within two days to assist in damage assessment.

Field service personnel arrived one day after Mancini and the following day, the day shift completed its site and safety orientation, organized tools and work areas and ran power and compressed-air lines as needed. The night shift received its site orientation, set up lighting and began disassembling the unit. The project proceeded at an aggressive pace from that point forward given the black-start cogen unit’s importance to mill production.

MD&A was awarded a turnkey contract for repairs, the major inspections of the turbine and generator, as well as some additional projects including the removal of the liquid-fuel and trip-oil systems.

Because the mill never had success operating on liquid fuel, the most practical solution was to not burn liquid fuel. That decision, made years ago by plant management, was easy given the ready availability of quality gas.

However, oil infrastructure eventually ran afoul of the company’s goal for continuous improvement. It took three shifts to remove liquid-fuel components to conduct a combustion inspection and three to reinstall it before engine restart.

The facility has been performing CIs at 8000-hr intervals so the cost, in terms of labor and outage schedule impact, added up quickly.

The plant engineer was guardedly optimistic about doubling that interval, as promised by the more robust coating applied by ACT Independent Turbo Services Inc, on hot-section parts in its Texan LaPorte shop during the outage. However, this doubling required approval by the facility’s insurer and the coating’s merit would need to be considered.

MD&A was credited with developing a plan to eliminate oil capability, including the fuel-nozzle mods, at less than half the cost estimated by an alternative supplier. It should also be noted that by eliminating the parasitic power associated with the liquid-fuel system, unit output increases by 280 kW.

Issues with fuel valves equipped with hydraulic actuators motivated the mill to replace that equipment with electrically actuated valves when the change to gas-only firing was made. With this upgrade, less gas is burned to produce a given amount of power than with hydraulic valves in the circuit.

Replacing the mechanical overspeed bolt and trip-oil system with an electronic overspeed trip enables operators to now verify trip functionality at 500 rpm without stressing the unit.

 

Converting from Dual Fuel to Gas-Only

The liquid fuel system (LFS) for this Frame 5 included the following subsystems: primary and secondary liquid fuel and purge, atomizing air, and water injection and purge. LFS decommissioning, a first step in the conversion of the unit to gas-only operation included deactivation or removal of all hardware associated with oil supply as well as of equipment in the subsystems noted.

During the forced outage, key components of the LFS were removed, but because of schedule constraints and the physical location of some hardware, it was not feasible to remove everything at that time. Others who have performed similar conversions told the editors it’s important to disconnect/remove components that would consume power when inactive—such as the fuel pump and atomizing air compressor—and simply abandon in place piping that would have no adverse impact on gas-only operations.

The end covers and piping inside the turbine compartment were modified during the outage to reflect elimination of the LFS; Mark V controls software was reconfigured to accommodate the changes made.

 

Checklist of LFS Hardware Removed

  • Accessory-gearbox oil-vapor eductor; a desiccant breather cap was installed in its place.
  • Atomizing-air booster compressor driven by the starting diesel, along with related piping and valves.
  • Atomizing-air pre-cooler and its cooling-water supply piping. Source-air piping from the atomizing-air pre-cooler inside the turbine compartment also was removed.
  • Extraction piping from the compressor to the atomizing- and purge-air subsystems.
  • Gas-fuel purge system hardware.
  • Primary liquid-fuel lines from the flow divider to the fuel nozzles.
  • The accessory-gear-driven atomizing air compressor—together with its drive gear and associated bearings.
  • The accessory-gear-driven fuel pump—together with the electric clutch, coupling, bypass valve, and gear and its bearings.
  • Water-injection piping to the fuel nozzles.

 

Fuel Valve Upgrades

The mill’s Frame 5 was equipped with a combined, hydraulically actuated gas stop speed/ratio (SRV) and control valve (GCV) and gas fuel splitter valve. Recall that the SRV and GCV are independent valves. Gas flows through the SRV to the GCV, which regulates the amount of fuel flowing to the ring manifold serving the 10 combustion chambers. The splitter valve serving on DLN machines divides gas flow between the primary and secondary fuel systems.

Turbine Technology Services Corp was retained to remove the liquid fuel system, as described above, and to replace the existing hydraulically actuated, 3-in. SRV/GCV and splitter valves with new electronic valves from Young & Franklin Inc. Existing gas supply strainers and valves were retained inside the compartment. A 3-in. stop valve was required in addition to electronic primary- and secondary-fuel control valves.

 

The company’s Dave Simmons told the editors TTS has deep experience in this work, having removed liquid-fuel capability on about 50 GE Frame 5s through EAs over the years and retrofitted electronic valves from different suppliers on perhaps 20 machines.

Simmons said elimination of liquid-fuel capability on a non-DLN gas turbine is relatively easy, but experience counts when a DLN engine is involved. This project was unique: It was the first time that a Mark V-equipped DLN-1 machine was converted to electronic valves for fuel control—and it took only four weeks from initial request to startup.

TTS proved it could satisfy project goals by running tests on its reconfigured Mark V simulator. No empirical testing was involved. There were no surprises, Simmons said. The Y&F valves performed the way the company said they would.

He added that an increasing number of plants are investigating conversion to electronic valves and most projects can be justified based on opportunity costs. One of the first things to do, Simmons continued, is to determine the availability of physical space to accommodate the new equipment. This shouldn’t be challenging for non-DLN machines, he said.

Some demolition and installation of the new valves and electrical conduit and wiring are key elements of the physical project. The editors were told that most wiring generally can be reused, excepting old non-DLN units. Otherwise, shielded cable is strongly recommended for use with electronic valves.

Finally, if considering electronic fuel valves for your plant, don’t forget to audit the control system logic file to see if it can accommodate the switch from hydraulics to electric. There was no such issue on this project because of all the liquid-fuel infrastructure removed.

TTS modified the gas control software in the Mark V panel and HMI operator screens and then performed functional and operational tests of the new gas control system.

 

Other Activities Required to Complete the Project

  • Disable piping to the gas control valve for the existing hydraulic- and trip-oil systems. Note that the mechanical overspeed trip was disabled when trip-oil supply to the gas control valve was terminated.
  • Install an emergency-stop pushbutton inside the accessory compartment.
  • Install two magnetic speed pickups and independently connect to the Mark V overspeed “hardware” trip.

To convert the dual-fuel end covers to gas only, the liquid-fuel and water-injection distributors were removed. The tubing runs connecting the distributors to the corresponding five primary-fuel nozzles on each end cover also were removed and caps installed in their place at the openings created. Secondary-fuel nozzles attach to the center of each end cover—their liquid-fuel and water-injection connections were also removed and capped.

 

To learn more about TTS’ dual fuel experience and capabilities for fuel conversions or upgrades, visit our website.

Turbine Technology Services Attracts New Talent


Dr. Gerry Fischer is in the house.

Houston, TX 5/05/2017 – Turbine Technology Services (TTS) is always looking for expertise in the Combustion Systems, Emission Technologies and Control Systems sectors. One notable candidate is Dr. Gerry Fischer. He has worked with TTS in the past on several task-oriented projects with very specific requirements. Now, TTS is pleased to announce Dr. Fischer’s role within the company as a consultant.

“Dr. Fischer is very impressive. His expertise and understanding of SCR upgrades for gas compression pipeline turbines will be very valuable to TTS and our clients,” said Frank Hoegler, Vice President of TTS and President of Reciprocating Technology Services (RTS), TTS’ sister company. “What’s more, he’s also worked extensively on combustion systems for slow speed reciprocating gas dual fuel engines. With his considerable gas turbine knowledge and many years of experience, we’re very excited for him to have an expanded role with us—we know he’s going to be a great fit in our team.”

TTS and RTS are two parts of the TTS Energy Services family of companies serving gas compression and power generation industries with a wide range of technical solutions and capabilities.

“TTS’ team of engineers takes innovation to a whole new level. I’m very excited about our association and our upcoming projects,” exclaimed Dr. Fischer, who earned his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Darmstadt University of Technology in Darmstadt, Germany. He was granted a US Patent for the development of new spark-ignited industrial engine emission-control technology, which meets the most stringent emission regulations of NOx < 0.15 g/bhp-hr.

Welcome to TTS, Dr. Fischer, where innovation and technology differentiates TTS Energy Services from the competition.

TTS Energy Services is the corporate parent for Turbine Technology Services (TTS) and Reciprocating Technology Services (RTS). TTS provides gas turbine technology expertise, turbine engineering and construction services worldwide. The company’s long history and experience providing technical solutions to global power generation entities makes it a leader in its field. TTS has successfully managed numerous gas turbine installations, modernization projects and supplied innovative and unique engineering solutions to vexing problems for gas turbine customers. RTS provides technical and field support for industrial power generation applications using reciprocating engines. Our field service technicians and engineers are seasoned in every aspect of reciprocating equipment, providing reliable services at any location, 24/7. In addition to repairs and diagnostics, the RTS team provides predictive and life-cycle maintenance to ensure maximum performance.

To learn more about TTS and RTS, please visit http://turbinetech.com/ and http://reciptech.com.

Energy Insights

No big surprise, but energy demand will continue to grow… “how” is the interesting part.

Originally a LinkedIn post by Scott Nyquist, McKinsey&Company

Edited and Updated by Scott Muster, Turbine Technology Services

power-linesThe successful outcome of COP21 has raised hopes and expectations of concerted global efforts to tackle climate change, and brought forward a whole raft of challenging questions:

  • How will this affect the momentum behind the deployment of key renewable technologies and the drive for greater energy efficiency?
  • Ample supply is keeping downward pressure on fossil fuel prices, coal, oil and natural gas. When and how will market dynamics change – or might lower prices for some fuels be here to stay?
  • The impact of local pollution, often energy-related, on air quality is a matter of rising social and political concern in many countries. How can governments act to tackle this problem – and what would these actions mean for the energy sector?

The World Energy Outlook 2016 published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) is coming out this month and will seek to shed some light on these questions with insightful analysis. In the meantime, there is one matter that everyone can agree on: for the near future, energy demand will continue to grow. How it is produced and used will be a critical factor in the future of the global economy, geopolitics, and the environment.

With that in mind, McKinsey took a hard look at the data, modeling energy demand by country, sector, and fuel mix, with an analysis of current conditions, historical data, and country-level assessments. On this basis, McKinsey’s Global Energy Insights team has put together a description of the global energy landscape to 2050.

It is important to understand that this is a business-as-usual scenario. It does not anticipate big disruptions in either the production or use of energy. And, of course, predicting the future of fraught with risk. Here are four of the most interesting insights.

  1. Global energy demand will continue to grow.

But growth will be slower—an average of about 0.7 percent a year through 2050 (versus an average of more than 2 percent from 2000 to 2015). The decline in the rate of growth is due to digitization, slower population and economic growth, greater efficiency, a decline in European and North American demand, and the global economic shift toward services, which use less energy than the production of goods. For example, in India, the percentage of GDP derived from services is expected to rise from 54 to 64 percent by 2035. And efficiency is a forthright good-news story. By 2035, McKinsey research expects that it will take almost 40 percent less fuel to propel a fossil-fueled car a mile than it does now. By 2050, global “energy intensity” (how much energy is used to produce each unit of GDP) will be half what it was in 2013. That may sound optimistic, but it is based on recent history. From 1990 to 2015, global energy intensity improved by almost a third, and it is reasonable to expect the rate of progress to accelerate.

  1. Demand for electricity will grow twice as fast as that for transport.

China and India will account for 71 percent of new capacity. By 2050, electricity will account for a quarter of all energy demand, compared with 18 percent now. How will that additional power be generated? More than three-quarters of new capacity (77 percent), per the McKinsey research, will come from wind and solar, 13 percent from natural gas, and the rest from everything else. The share of nuclear and hydro is also expected to grow, albeit modestly.

What that means is that by 2050, non-hydro renewables will account for more than a third of global power generation—a huge increase from the 2014 level of 6 percent. To put it another way, between now and 2050, wind and solar are expected to grow four to five times faster than every other source of power.

  1. Fossil fuels will dominate energy use through 2050.

This is because of the massive investments that have already been made and because of the superior energy intensity and reliability of fossil fuels. The mix, however, will change. Gas will continue to grow quickly, but the global demand for coal will likely peak around 2025. Growth in the use of oil, which is predominantly used for transport, will slow down as vehicles get more efficient and more electric; here, peak demand could come as soon as 2030. By 2050, the research estimates that coal will be down to just 16 percent of global power generation (from 41 percent now) and fossil fuels to 38 percent (from 66 percent now). Overall, though, coal, oil, and, gas will continue to be 74 percent of primary energy demand, down from 82 percent now. After that, the rate of decline is likely to accelerate.

  1. Energy-related greenhouse-gas emissions will rise 14 percent in the next 20 years.

Of course, this is not what needs to happen to keep the planet from warming another two degrees, the goal of the 2015 Paris climate conference. Around 2035, though, emissions will flatten and then fall, for two main reasons. First, cars and trucks will be cleaner, due to more efficient engines and the deployment of electric vehicles. Second, there is the shift in the power industry toward gas and renewables discussed above. The countervailing trends are that there are likely to be some 1.5 billion more people by 2035, and global GDP will rise by about half over that period. All those people will need to eat and work, and that means more energy.

Here are the disclaimers:

  • All the above is based on assumptions and subject to change.
  • A concerted global action complying with COP21 guidelines to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions could change the arc of these trends.
  • Technological disruptions and innovative developments could also bend the curve.
  • The IEA may see different outlooks.

Our Thoughts

Whether you agree with the predictions outlined in this report or not, for energy businesses, the implications are clear: given that global energy demand will grow substantially, prices will continue to be volatile.

To reduce related risks and costs associated to the volatility, energy efficiency while mitigating the effects on the environment is a mandate. Energy producers and technological engineering companies like TTS will need to continue working closely together on innovations that can affect the efficiency of producing energy for the world.

For more information about TTS and our energy innovations, visit www.turbinetech.com.

Turbine Technology Services Announces Formation of New Corporate Flagship, TTS Energy Services

TTS Energy Services has been launched to encompass the expertise of both Turbine Technology Services and its recent expansion into oil and gas with Reciprocating Technology Services.

Tony Thornton, President of TTS, would like to introduce the new corporate flagship, TTS Energy Services. The driver behind this formation is a corporate growth strategy in diversifying the offerings the experts at TTS and RTS can offer the industry, entering new market segments and managing this all under a single corporate entity.
… [Read More]

TTS Enterprises Expands Industry Capabilities with Launch of Reciprocating Technology Services

Reciprocating Technology Services will provide comprehensive solutions for oil and gas reciprocating engines and compressors.

TTS Enterprises is excited to announce the launch of our new company, Reciprocating Technology Services (RTS). RTS joins Turbine Technology Services Corporation (TTS) to solidify our worldwide engineering capabilities for the power generation, oil and gas industry. … [Read More]